Find us

Contact us

Visit us

The Olde Watermill Shopping Village

Barton Mill Lane

off Faldo Rd, Barton Le Clay 

Bedfordshire

MK45 4RF

View on Google Maps

​Monday:  9.30am - 5.30pm

Tuesday:  CLOSED

Wednesday to Saturday:  9.30am - 5.30pm

Sunday & Bank holidays:  10am - 5pm

  • Facebook Confetti Curves Plus Size
  • Instagram Confetti Curves Plus Size

Follow us

Copyrights © 2018 Confetti and Curves LTD.

Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions 

Company Reg No: 10740219

The Average Wedding Cost Guide



Planning your budget is a crucial part of your wedding preparation, but what does the average wedding cost? Here we reveal some of the key costs you can expect from various suppliers, and what you should be asking before you book…


Research carried out on behalf of professional marketplace www.Bidvine.com in 2017 highlighted that Britons typically spend between £14,400 and £46,200 on their wedding, depending on where they are based in the UK. Unsurprisingly, those living in London spent £17,000 more on their big day than the UK average. Since the research, the UK average has increased by £1,355 to £30,355, with this figure predicted to rise in the years to come.


So, what does the average wedding cost? Here’s a breakdown of some of the different aspects as a rough guide:


Venue hire – £4,354

Catering (food and drink) – £2,060

Wedding band – £1,600

Wedding dress – £1,385

Wedding planner – £968

Videographer – £778

Wedding decorating – £690

Photographer – £660

Flowers – £432

Wedding suit – £300

Hair and makeup – £170


The average total cost here, before taking into account more personalised areas such as wedding rings and multiple bridesmaid dresses, usher suits and more, is £13,397. And that’s also before you factor in the travel costs of a honeymoon too, which comes in at £3,500 on average!


Testing out the Wedding Cost Calculator online will help to give you a rough estimate of what your wedding might cost and will be tailored depending on what aspects you want to include within your wedding, taking into account average costs for the region you’re getting married in.


Your wedding day, as well as your house deposit, is likely to be the biggest one-off expenses you’ll ever shell out for. With this in mind, how do you know when you’re being offered a good deal and how can you tell if you’re being ripped off?



Ask to see a portfolio or examples of work

Photographers and videographers should have a plentiful bank of case studies for you to look at for examples of their work, but be sure that you’re looking at recent examples that prove their skill set is still up to par. You also want to look for things such as angles, lighting, editing, the range of shots available (are there plenty of the happy couple as well as guests? Have key parts of speeches been incorporated? Is there sufficient footage and a spread of the entire day from morning through to the evening reception, etc.).


The same advice about looking at recent, up-to-date feedback goes for entertainers too, from magicians and walkabouts to DJs and live bands.


Be sure to taste before you book

Whether that’s your wedding catering, any special drinks you might have on the menu and even your wedding cake – you’ll want to sample the goods before you put down a deposit and make any sort of commitment.


Get plenty of recommendations

In terms of word-of-mouth, you want to look at a company’s website and social media pages to get an idea of how they’ve been reviewed by previous customers. Are the reviews good? Are they getting any major complaints in the comments section? How are they being rated?


Take this with a pinch of salt though, as some of the recommendations online and on their social media pages may be by friends (or enemies) of those looking to get or dissuade from bookings. Don’t be afraid to reach out to people on social media who have been a customer to ask about their experiences.


Likewise, ask your friends who are married about the suppliers that they used and if they’d recommend them.



Don’t use the ‘W’ word

While you want to shout about the fact you’re getting married, try to refrain from using the ‘W’ word (wedding) when collecting price quotes; simply because suppliers will up their fees if they know they’re providing a service for a wedding. If you get a quote for a party and then go on to book for your wedding, you are then in a good position to query the cost if it jumps by quite a bit.


Don’t pay the full cost upfront

Most suppliers, if not all, will require a deposit upon booking and then the remainder of the payment to be made closer to the date of your wedding. It’s very rare that someone should be asking for full payment upfront and you should be wary of anyone that is.


Ultimately, every wedding is different and tailored to the couple getting married. No two weddings will ever be the same. And even if you’re having a similar wedding to a friend or relative, your costs may vary greatly. It’s wise to start saving at least 12 months before your wedding, creating a budget and keeping track of all payments; deposits paid, payment dates and more.